Mastering Spectroscopy

A mobile and interactive learning application to assist students in the learning of organic spectroscopy

Brief

Onlea works with clients on specific apps that provide flexible time and mobility for students to practice challenging concepts towards subject mastery. We partnered with the University of Alberta to develop an interactive tutorial to engage and assist students in the learning of organic spectroscopy and structure elucidation that would serve to complement the introductory organic course offering aimed at between 2,500 to 3,000 students per year. The experience should be mobile and students should be able to access it on their desktop, tablet devices and/or mobile phones.

Solution

Modern Web Technologies

Using modern web technologies our development team produced an experience that works on all platforms (desktop, android and iOS) and it’s accessible through multiple devices

Smooth User Experience

By incorporating feedback from students and instructors, a smooth and intuitive user experience was achieved. Users can simply authenticate through Google account, save their progress easily and resume it at any point. Students test their knowledge and reward their progress by unlocking new samples as they progress.

Pattern recognition is an important factor in organic spectroscopy. The user can drag and drop the identified functional groups and put them together to build the compound. If the compound has already been built by the user, they will see the assembled compound, along with the test results, and an unlocked fact about the compound.

Once a peak is accurately assigned, the molecule becomes available in the user’s notebook. The peak is also labeled and highlighted with a color corresponding to the functional group.

Results

In Mastering Spectroscopy, learners practice organic chemistry by analyzing Infrared (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and mass spectrum data for a variety of organic samples. They can identify functional groups and proton types in the graphs, then build the compound based on their findings.